Faith in Humanity

Keera Wilmoth

The power of social media is an extraordinary thing. A YouTube video can go viral in the span of hours, pictures of missing people can be spread throughout the nation by the click of a button, and a 15-second video called the “Ice Bucket Challenge” can add millions of dollars in donations to help awareness and research for  Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

ALS is a disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.

The Ice Bucket Challenge includes being “nominated” by another person, having a bucket full of ice dumped on their head, “nominating” three other people to accept the challenge, then donating $10 to help the cause. If a person chooses not to accept the challenge, they must donate $100 instead.

There have been many complaints about how the Ice Bucket Challenge swallows up all social media and people are “wasting clean water to avoid donating money to charity,” but is that really correct? Donations for ALS have reached over $94 million and continue to skyrocket.

In order to help society develop and grow in a positive and beneficial way, do not be afraid to look a little silly! In the end, I would rather all of my social media accounts be dominated by videos of people throwing ice on their heads rather than have people be unaware of such a condition.

Creative foundations makes a difference in community

Keera Wilmoth

Founded in 2001 by David Robins, Creative Foundations helps local minds dive into  imaginative mentalities.

Creative Foundations is an organization that allows people with developmental disabilities to create art, socialize, and express themselves in a positive way. Their main goal is to help these people develop life skills that they can use later in life in a friendly and encouraging environment.

Not only do the artists create artwork, but they can design graphics online and have jobs such as paper shredding.

“[The best part about being hired by David Robins is that] I’ve proven to myself that if I make a difference, I can improve on it,” artist Tina Dinovo said.

Located in downtown Delaware, this organization gets involved in many local activities. Members can be seen selling their artwork at First Fridays and even Comfest.

The artists get paid for up to three hours a day, usually starting at minimum wage and earning commission for every painting they sell. The artists hold meetings called “People First Intervention” to help them express feelings they may have about life in a constructive way.

“[Creative Foundations] means family,” artist Paul Day said. “What I think this place means is that you can go anywhere in life as long as you believe you have the power to.”

Class bell in popular sitcom to ring again

Gabrielle Cockerham • Staff Writer

“Saved by the Bell” was one of the earliest teen based shows to become popular at the peak of the 90’s. Its popularity may rise again with the premier of a brand new movie, but not without breaking the hearts of its original fans.
Even though the film is based around the television series, it is anything but the sitcom early 90’s teens grew up with. The name may deceive viewers, as the film isn’t based off the students from Bayside High, but the actors behind the characters. A clip recently released of the movie shows the teen idols bickering while posing for a photoshoot and Dustin Diamond’s [Screech] portrayer throwing a punch at a fan.
Lifetime premiered the unofficial “behind-the-scenes” movie on September 1. According to the official movie page, “The Unauthorized Saved by the Bell Story delves into the experiences of six unknown young actors placed into the Hollywood spotlight, exposing the challenges of growing up under public scrutiny while trying to maintain the squeaky clean image of their popular characters both on and off-screen.”
Along with a new movie, August marks the 25th anniversary of the beginning of the show, “Saved by the Bell.” The first episode aired on August 20, 1989 on NBC and televised its final episode on May 22, 1993. The show featured six teens and their principal as they struggled with relationships, caffeine addiction and pop quizzes.
The Saturday morning favorite emerged from the Disney Channel series “Good Morning, Miss Bliss.” The show lasted one brief year before being canceled by Disney and several cast members moving up to “Saved by the Bell.” only two months later. Fans have always questioned the sudden change from the Junior High character attending school in Indianapolis, Indiana to Bayside High School in Pacific Palisades, California between the short two months.
While some fans may be thrilled for the movie, the original cast is not as enthusiastic. One of the former stars Mark-Paul Gosselaar [Zack Morris], mentions neither him nor most fellow cast members were consulted for the movie.
The movie is loosely based on the tell-all book written by Dustin Diamond in 2009. The autobiography focuses on the wild life the cast and crew lived away from the public eye. This book has been controversial since its release, as it mentions both true and constructed events.
One event mentioned in the book is an account of Gosselaar using steroids before the production of “Saved by the Bell: The College Years” in 1994. “He suddenly exploded with manliness, loading 25 pounds of muscle on his once-scrawny frame in, oh, about a month,” wrote Diamond. He later retracted several events such as this and blamed it on his co-author.
Hopefully the movie will bring more nostalgia than despair to fans who watch what went on behind-the-scenes.v

A day in the life: Marching Band

Emma Chapman • Staff Writer

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The Hayes marching band practices a routine in the grassy area in front of the building. This routine will be performed by the group for Friday night football games and at competitions.

In the past, members of the band haven’t always gotten the appreciation they deserve. Recently, I’ve had the honor of sitting in and watching their practice, and was astonished by how dedicated they were, even with the insane heat.

Personally, I could never stand the heat or the sun, being the sensitive skinned beauty I am. I burn extremely easy, and just from being with the band from 2:45-6 p.m , I managed to have decently burned cheeks the next day.

Taking in the fact that they practice Tuesdays and Thursdays every week, the members of the band either now have a resistance to the sun or douse themselves in sunscreen everyday.

Along with those two practices, the band also had a camp that took place in the summer that lasted five days and started at 9 a.m. and ended at 9 p.m. During this time, they did a majority of their practice outside in the blazing summer heat.

Besides working on memorization of their music or their dots (positions on the field), members also took time to enjoy each others company and bonded as what you could call a “family”. Many member are friends outside of school, or even dating romantically.

The trouble that came along with practice wasn’t just the sunburn, but at the end of the practice I felt both emotionally and physically exhausted due to the simple fact I was sitting under the sun for such a long time, which just drains the life out of you. I was completely shocked by how awful I felt, and couldn’t possibly imagine how the field member were feeling.

When I finally got home I had absolutely no motivation to do anything including homework, and decided let my world lit homework wait until my study hall the next day. I believe the band members must be extremely devoted to find that perfect balance between school, band, and social life that is necessary in order to strive as a member.

I have absolute no idea what was going through the field members heads as they were being commanded to run around, and re-due the same things over and over again in order to get it completely correct.

By the end of this whole experience, I have come to the conclusions that I could never be an official member of the Delaware Hayes Marching Band. I lack the dedication and will power these students show on a daily bases in school and at practice.

In the past, members of the band haven’t always gotten the appreciation they deserve. Recently, I’ve had the honor of sitting in and watching their practice, and was astonished by how dedicated they were, even with the insane heat.

Personally, I could never stand the heat or the sun, being the sensitive skinned beauty I am. I burn extremely easy, and just from being with the band from 2:45-6 p.m , I managed to have decently burned cheeks the next day.

Taking in the fact that they practice Tuesdays and Thursdays every week, the members of the band either now have a resistance to the sun or douse themselves in sunscreen everyday.

Along with those two practices, the band also had a camp that took place in the summer that lasted five days and started at 9 a.m. and ended at 9 p.m. During this time, they did a majority of their practice outside in the blazing summer heat.

Besides working on memorization of their music or their dots (positions on the field), members also took time to enjoy each others company and bonded as what you could call a “family”. Many member are friends outside of school, or even dating romantically.

The trouble that came along with practice wasn’t just the sunburn, but at the end of the practice I felt both emotionally and physically exhausted due to the simple fact I was sitting under the sun for such a long time, which just drains the life out of you. I was completely shocked by how awful I felt, and couldn’t possibly imagine how the field member were feeling.

When I finally got home I had absolutely no motivation to do anything including homework, and decided let my world lit homework wait until my study hall the next day. I believe the band members must be extremely devoted to find that perfect balance between school, band, and social life that is necessary in order to strive as a member.

I have absolute no idea what was going through the field members heads as they were being commanded to run around, and re-due the same things over and over again in order to get it completely correct.

By the end of this whole experience, I have come to the conclusions that I could never be an official member of the Delaware Hayes Marching Band. I lack the dedication and will power these students show on a daily bases in school and at practice.

Book-to-movie trend causes disappointment with fans

Gabrielle Cockerham • Staff Writer

More books than ever before are having a sticker slapped on them that reads “Now a Major Motion Picture.” The idea of transforming a book into a movie is nothing new, but the number of adaptations are increasing every year.
Bringing a book to the big screen can be beneficial to both authors and producers. Some of the most anticipated movies of the upcoming year, such as “Mockingjay,” “Paper Towns,” and “The DUFF,” are award-winning novels that have been itching to be in theaters since their release.
Although books that have been adapted into movies have been blockbusters in the past, recent films based on books have been a swing and a miss. “The Host,” “City of Bones,” and “Beautiful Creatures” are among the box-office failures. These flicks are usually unsuccessful due to the facts they don’t have the same appeal to moviegoers as they do avid book readers.
“The book was better than the movie” is not a phrase new to our vocabulary as more novels have been converted to films. As these movies come to the big screen, a new fan base grows while old fans are left feeling frustrated and bitter due to a story that has been transformed by Hollywood.
One dilemma that book-based fans have faced is the altering of the story line they’ve come to love. Some of the biggest modifications include the erasing of a character or even transforming the whole ending of a story, such as erasing Uriah from “Divergent” or adding a plot twist to “Breaking Dawn Part Two.” Fans of the book often object to the amount of detail left out of films as well.
It must be addressed though, there is only so much producers can fit into a movie in its appointed time. Of course the conversation between character A and character B was important to them building a friendship, but what if that meant the producers couldn’t fit in the fight scene between the hero and the villain? At the end of the day, something will have to be cut to prevent a ten-hour movie.
Although the authors of these stories do make a profit from the production, they could be making just as much from a rise in book sales. Data collected by The Nielsen Company has showed that “Eat, Pray, Love” by Elizabeth Gilbert sold 94,000 copies two weeks before the movie release, which is the same number of books sold the year it was published.
Depending on the person, the idea of having another book-based movie can be exciting or exhausting. Either way, it’s best to prepare for numerous best-selling novels to be adapted over the upcoming years.v

Xbox One v. Playstation 4: war between consoles continues

Emma Chapman • Staff Writer
Over the years, the dispute of “which console is better?” has become very prominent in the gaming industry. Two of the most popular competitors, Xbox and Playstation, generally go up against each other just to produce similar products, leaving the common gamer at a loss as to which system they should buy.

Last November, Playstation and Xbox released their newest creations: the Xbox One and Playstation 4. Both consoles share some distinctive similarities, but their differences will make or break the deal.

While both have the lovely price of $399.99 and 500GB storage, the products don’t offer the same features that gamers would naturally expect a console to have. The Xbox One, following in the Xbox 360’s shoes, requires gamers to have an Xbox Live Gold membership in order to access Netflix, Hulu, and other apps of the sort.

According to Imagine Games Network, or IGN, PS4 gives users free access to those apps without having to pay a certain amount of money a month or year, and for something users already have to pay to access. This saves the consumers money on what they would have to pay in order to access the apps if they had used an Xbox one.

One feature the Xbox One has is that it isn’t Backwards compatible; this means that older games will have to be remade in order to be playable on Xbox One.

Both consoles have the basic sense that you can play games without internet connection, but the Xbox has a mandatory system update on the first day, according to IGN. This means the users will absolutely have to have connection to the internet, and then have to wait to actually play their Xbox One, because no disc games will work without the mandatory update.

With the limited amount of storage that both consoles offer, it’s helpful that both systems come with cloud storage, but after that gamers are limited as to how to store and save data from their games. According to IGN and luckily for Xbox One users, the system comes with an external storage in the form of a USB drive, while the PS4 has absolutely no external storage for its users.

It really comes down to the buyer and his or her personality. That being said, consumers should always do research on the product before hand just to make sure they’re getting the most bang for their buck.

Girls’ coaches focus on hard work, development

Sarah Heber • Distribution Manager

Three girls teams, three new coaches, one common goal. Julieanne McClain took over as head coach for girls tennis. Girls golf, an entirely new sport at Hayes, welcomed Steve Lehman as head coach. Lastly, Mark Thomas took on the assistant coach position for girls volleyball. The common goal these new coaches hope to achieve this fall is simply growth and development.

After spending two years as the assistant tennis coach for Worthington Christian High School, McClain now takes on the head coach role here at Hayes. While at Worthington Christian she coached both boys and girls, but she is focusing on helping the girls team here at Hayes.

“I enjoying being able to watch a match going on, give a couple pointers, and then see the players really own that advice and change, especially when it makes the difference between a winning and losing,” McClain said.

The team graduated a fair amount of seniors last year but McClain still has high expectations for the returning players and new players as well.

“It’s a growing year. I know that is cliché but it really is a growing year in every sense,” she said. “So it’s going to be an exciting season. It’s probably not going to be exciting in terms of score but it’ll for sure be in terms of growth.”

Similar to the tennis team, the girls golf team is going to have a growing year. This is a new sport to Hayes and it has already caught students’ attention.

“We’ve always had a number of girls who wanted to play and we thought we had a full team last year but a couple of them weren’t able to play so we ended up one player short,” Lehman said.

To form a full team, only four golfers are required, however Lehman is pleased that the team stands strong with seven members this year.

“For competitive purposes and for other things like injuries it is nice to have more,” Lehman said.

With this being a new sport to Hayes, he is excited to spread the word about girls golf and simply  teach them about the beauty of the sport.

Lehman wants his athletes “to learn to enjoy the game and learn all that it has to offer,” he said. “[Golf] is something they can play till they’re 90 years old.”

The final change for girls sports this season is that Coach Thomas took on the role as assistant coach for the volleyball team. He now currently coaching three sports, teaching, and is also a husband and a father of two young boys. Although he has a full plate, he is still excited to help the volleyball program grow.

“I’d say my expectations for the season would be just to get better as a program, to get better as a team and as a group of girls,” Thomas said.

Thomas hopes to help set the foundation of tradition for years to come. After already doing so with the softball program, he is confident he can do the same with the volleyball team. Thomas enjoys being the assistant for the volleyball team, especially since he is head coach for softball.

“It’s pretty cool to get to take that step back, letting Lee run things and then I can just give tips every once and a while,” Thomas said. “I can laugh a little bit more with the girls instead of being as serious.”

With all these changes this fall, the level of anticipation for the future face of girls sports at Hayes is at an all time high. The new coaches are pushing their girls to raise the level of competition and are asking for more out of them than ever before. If everything goes according to plan, the girls sports programs will continue to grow stronger in the upcoming years.

‘Finding Carter’ climbs ratings charts

Megan Swisher • Staff Writer
The teenage world is hard enough, but being thrown into a whole new life with new people can turn everything upside down.

In the new hit TV series “Finding Carter,” Carter Stevens gets taken away from everything she’s ever known when she finds out that her single mother Lori Stevens abducted her as a toddler. She then is forced to live with her biological family and vows to be reunited with Lori.

Along Carter’s journey she faces many issues with her sudden change in lifestyles. She has to deal with the usual situations such as high school and boys, but now with her new family she’s having trust issues and feels as if she doesn’t fit in.

Her biological mother, detective Elizabeth Wilson, does not approve of Carter’s behavior and is very unsure about her daily decisions. This creates tension between the two and leads to many secrets and lies right from the beginning.

Carter also finds out that she has a twin sister named Taylor and a little brother named Grant who are the complete opposites of herself. The girls get along well at first, until Taylor’s crush Gabe starts to develop feelings for Carter, which creates major controversy between the two.

The series aired on MTV July 8, 2014 and is concluding its 12 episode long season September 16. Fans have been watching this all throughout the summer and eagerly waiting for Tuesday nights to see what happens next.

Popularity has struck the show even with it being only one season so far. According to TV By the Numbers, “Finding Carter” is the #1 cable television show for 2014 for teenage viewers.

With its compelling story and thriving audience, Carter will indeed be found.

Students need better relationships with staff

Abbey Jones • Event Coordinator

During the first day of school, most teachers will introduce themselves to each of their  classes. They show everyone pictures of their dogs, talk about their husbands or wives, share about their favorite things to do when they aren’t working. However, after that initial “getting to know you” part of the first day of class, they don’t share much about themselves until somebody makes an effort to get to know them better.

As a student body, Hayes doesn’t try enough to get to know its teachers well enough, and it’s vitally important to do so. Teaching is a very open, extroverted profession, and most of those who work at Hayes are some of the most outgoing teachers there are today. The staff throughout Delaware is an extremely caring, personable, and all around high-performing group of adults.

It is entirely up to the student, however, to approach a desired teacher and establish trust, find mutual interests, and show concern of getting to know one another. This may be the worst part to any high schooler, but is well worth the anxiety to work towards getting to know someone who will be in the same room for the next nine months.

Students should feel more comfortable asking teachers about their lives and what they are like out of the chair behind the desk. Even those teachers who aren’t comfortable with sharing personal details generally enjoy telling students about their favorite books or how they view the world around them.

It’s almost always more fun when a deeper student-teacher relationship is established. Walking into a classroom where there’s a mutual trust and admiration between the two is much more comfortable than trying to learn from someone that remains a stranger through the whole year.

While it is important to have respect for any authoritative figure, it’s also helpful to break down the almost awkward social barrier that generally comes with student/teacher relationships. It’s different for elementary and even middle school students; most high school to teacher age gaps aren’t terribly large, many teachers being in the same generation as students.

Student/teacher relationships are also extremely beneficial when applying for colleges, when teacher recommendations are a required part of most applications. It’s easier for a student to ask a teacher they know for a recommendation, and its easier for a teacher to give a solid, professional, yet personal and loving reflection if they know the student well.

Having at least one safe place in the building (a classroom where a student can work and relax without fear of intimidation or peer pressure) is also extremely important. Teachers are more than willing to open their rooms during their free periods, and some allow students to work in their rooms even while a different class is going on.

It’s very important to have mutual trust and admiration in the classroom, and the bonds formed between staff and students can be vital to growing up. It’s extremely fulfilling for a student to walk into a class and know that he or she is welcome, that they can engage in a conversation with that teacher, or tell them if they need help with school or with life in general.

Having a personal connection with at least one teacher help make the classroom less stressful, more fun, and benefit both parties, helping both have a better year. Meaningful relationships also make high school just slightly more bearable during the day as well.

Counselors improve department, help students

Mallory King • News Editor

Hayes has over 1,700 students, 85 teachers, and now 5 guidance counselors.

Megan Burwinkel is the newest member of the counseling department. This is her first year as a high school counselor.

 “I think I’m most excited about just building more relationships with the kids because I am so new,” Burwinkel said. “Basically 400 kids have me as their counselor and have never met me… I’m just excited about building that relationship with everyone.”

Four hundred students for one counselor is a lot compared to other schools.

“The national standard for the American School Counseling Association (ASCA)  is a ratio of 1 [counselor to] 250 [students],” Burwinkel said.

The incoming freshmen will now get extra support from Hayes. Jessica Darcy is the new freshman counselor. Last year, Darcy was a counselor over all grade levels.

“From eighth grade to ninth grade, our students were struggling,” said Ric Stranges, the principal at Hayes. “So we wanted to dedicate a counselor just to them, who can meet them down there at Dempsey, who can be with them all year and can be able to meet their needs better.“

This extra support is meant to help students down the road.

“If they are successful in ninth grade, that foundation on the other end will pay dividends,” Stranges said. “If we can strengthen that foundation…I think that is going to help us when they get to be seniors.”

Current seniors are also benefiting from the changes this year.

“We did not have any counselor dedicated to career and college counseling, who could help with Naviance, who could make relationships with college admissions officers,” Stranges said.

Now, Leigh Conant, the new college and career counselor, will make those relationships with colleges. Like Darcy, Conant was a counselor covering all grade levels last year.

 “I’m starting from the center point, with Ohio Wesleyan,” Conant said. ”So I have already been in contact with them and have been meeting with their admissions counselor, just to start from the beginning, then kind of spiraling my way out.”

Making connections with colleges is important, especially for students who do not have above average grades.

“What I’m going to do, is send [Mrs. Conant] all over to meet the admissions officers, so… when you are ready to make the college choice, she will already know them on a first name basis,” Stranges said. “That connection helps our students get into colleges.”

Conant also works with the students here at Hayes.

“Right now… I have already started many students’ transcripts that decided to get a head start on them over the summer,” Conant said. “I’ve been in communication with students for months now: working on college choice, sending transcripts,… [writing] letters of recommendation. I have met with the whole senior class to work with them.”

She will also have more student interaction this year. This will allow students to have one person to help them with transitioning out of high school and into the real world.

“I’m most excited about reworking some of our programs, [and] being able to get into classrooms with students more than I was before,” Conant said.

The counrseling department thinks this new way of counseling will have a significant impact on students when they do graduate.

 “I want to see more kids go to college,” Stranges said. “If we have someone who can make that process smoother, I think we will get more students to have the college experience.”

The counselors and administrators have made these changes in order to improve the students’ lives.

“Honestly, they are the model for a lot of other districts to look at and see how this is going to be, so this is kind of neat,” Stranges said.

The ultimate goal is to guide the students to be the best they can be.

“I like the fact that we kind of reinvented the way that we serve our students in the counseling department,” Stranges said. “Instead of just being normal, let’s find a better way to serve all of our students.”

The voice of Delaware Hayes High School students